What is Metformin, and What is it Used For?

Metformin is an oral medication commonly prescribed to manage type 2 diabetes. It belongs to the class of drugs known as biguanides and works primarily by decreasing glucose production in the liver and improving insulin sensitivity, thereby enhancing the body’s ability to utilize glucose more effectively.

Metformin is often the first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes due to its effectiveness, safety profile, and low risk of causing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). It helps control blood sugar levels, reducing the risk of diabetes-related complications such as heart disease, kidney damage, and nerve damage.

In addition to its primary use in diabetes management, metformin is also prescribed for conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) to help regulate menstrual cycles and improve insulin resistance. Emerging research suggests potential benefits in weight management and reducing the risk of certain cancers, though these uses are not yet standard practice.

What is Metformin, and What is it Used For?